Knew the Storm

26 Jul 2014

mortisia:

Let’s learn together about Edgar Allan Poe and his work. 33

The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven’s mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man’s slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word “Nevermore”. The poem makes use of a number of folk and classical references.

Edit by me | Please dont remove anything | For more here 

Poe claimed to have written the poem very logically and methodically, intending to create a poem that would appeal to both critical and popular tastes, as he explained in his 1846 follow-up essay “The Philosophy of Composition”. The poem was inspired in part by a talking raven in the novel Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of ‘Eighty by Charles Dickens. Poe borrows the complex rhythm and meter of Elizabeth Barrett’s poem “Lady Geraldine’s Courtship”, and makes use of internal rhyme as well as alliteration throughout. The Raven was first attributed to Poe in print in the New York Evening Mirror on January 29, 1845. Its publication made Poe widely popular in his lifetime, although it did not bring him much financial success. Soon reprinted, parodied, and illustrated, critical opinion is divided as to the poem’s status, but it nevertheless remains one of the most famous poems ever written.

25 Jul 2014

(Source: fambase)

22 Jul 2014

fozmeadows:

scienceofsarcasm:

Evening Post: August 12, 1899.
"She immediately alighted, caught hold of the astonished youth, and gave him a sound thrashing, using her fists in a scientific fashion…”

I would love to know what this means.

I think that might be code for “punched him in the balls with devastating accuracy”.

22 Jul 2014

You thought that just because this is a vintage blog, there would not be cats. Well, you are wrong, babe. Even vintage broads love adorable kitties!

(Source: iraffiruse)

22 Jul 2014

saladinahmed:

Handling harassment, 1940. (from PLANET COMICS)

saladinahmed:

Handling harassment, 1940. (from PLANET COMICS)

21 Jul 2014

antique-royals:

Lily Elsie in The Merry Widow 

21 Jul 2014

natgeofound:

A Native American sends smoke signals in Montana, June 1909.Photograph by Dr. Joseph K. Dixon, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

A Native American sends smoke signals in Montana, June 1909.Photograph by Dr. Joseph K. Dixon, National Geographic Creative

17 Jul 2014

(Source: dutchy66)

16 Jul 2014

thehystericalsociety:

Frances - c. 1910s - (Via)

thehystericalsociety:

Frances - c. 1910s - (Via)

14 Jul 2014

medievalpoc:

miloucomehome:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.

Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.

Oh, and by the way…

Tudor:

image

Elizabethan:

image

Stuart:

image

Georgian:

image

Regency:

image

Victorian:

image

Edwardian:

image

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

Holy shi—the middle lady in the Victorian pic looks like my godmum! And the lady, on the right, in the Edwardian one looks almost like she could pass as one of my relatives!

…this is so eerie…but cool.

^^And that’s a big part of the reason why I do this. Everyone should be able to see images like these and feel like they, too, are a part of history.

People can quibble about minutiae as much as they’d like, and I honestly don’t mind the discussion, but when it comes down to it, medievalpoc is really about making an immediate visual impact that has changed how I view history, and I hope the same can be said for people who read these posts.

9 Jul 2014

thegetty:

On July 9, 1846, the United States occupied the small port of Yerba Buena.
It was renamed San Francisco a year later.
Pictured are some of the new urban residents, following the population boom brought on by the Gold Rush of 1849.
The Cliff House, San Francisco, 1879-1880, Carleton Watkins. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

On July 9, 1846, the United States occupied the small port of Yerba Buena.

It was renamed San Francisco a year later.

Pictured are some of the new urban residents, following the population boom brought on by the Gold Rush of 1849.

The Cliff House, San Francisco, 1879-1880, Carleton Watkins. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

9 Jul 2014

thegetty:

On July 9, 1846, the United States occupied the small port of Yerba Buena.
It was renamed San Francisco a year later.
Pictured are some of the new urban residents, following the population boom brought on by the Gold Rush of 1849.
The Cliff House, San Francisco, 1879-1880, Carleton Watkins. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

On July 9, 1846, the United States occupied the small port of Yerba Buena.

It was renamed San Francisco a year later.

Pictured are some of the new urban residents, following the population boom brought on by the Gold Rush of 1849.

The Cliff House, San Francisco, 1879-1880, Carleton Watkins. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

5 Jul 2014

The great and gorgeous Judy Garland.

The great and gorgeous Judy Garland.

(Source: judyinlove)

4 Jul 2014

4 Jul 2014

billcorbett:

Mickey and his wives in the swinging 70s.

billcorbett:

Mickey and his wives in the swinging 70s.

(Source: illyadarling)