Knew the Storm

26 Aug 2014

26 Aug 2014

unexplained-events:

Key Guns

Dating all the way back to at least the 17th century, there has been evidence of key guns used by jailers. The keys were filled with gun powder to create a primitive gun that could be detonated if there was any trouble when opening a cell door.

SOURCE

14 Aug 2014

75 years ago, on this date, Billie Holiday recorded a song that Time Magazine would call song of the century: Strange Fruit, a song written about a lynching in the South. 

Holiday first performed the song at Cafe Society in 1939. She said that singing it made her fearful of retaliation but, because its imagery reminded her of her father, she continued to sing the piece making it a regular part of her live performances. Because of the poignancy of the song, Josephson drew up some rules: Holiday would close with it; the waiters would stop all service in advance; the room would be in darkness except for a spotlight on Holiday’s face; and there would be no encore. During the musical introduction, Holiday would stand with her eyes closed, as if she were evoking a prayer.

(Source: salsmineo)

Play count: 90,403

12 Aug 2014

gothiccharmschool:

mortisia:

Afternoon dress by Bernard, Les Modes September 1909. Photo by Reutlinger

Hat goals. Outfit goals.

gothiccharmschool:

mortisia:

Afternoon dress by Bernard, Les Modes September 1909. Photo by Reutlinger

Hat goals. Outfit goals.

12 Aug 2014

gatabella:

Lauren Bacall

gatabella:

Lauren Bacall

12 Aug 2014

“Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t”

- Lauren Bacall (September 16, 1924 - August 12, 2014)

R.i.P.

9 Aug 2014

arabamolsamontgiymezdim:

  1. Plath in a Mademoiselle photo shoot of the guest editors
  2. Sylvia Plath (2)
  3. Sylvia Plath , in Paris
  4. sylvia plath and ted hughes
  5. Sylvia Plath is photographed while interviewing poet Elizabeth Bowen for Mademoiselle
  6. Sylvia Plath ve Ted Hughes
  7. Sylvia Plath
  8. Ted Hughes & Sylvia Plath

4 Aug 2014

photo-a:

Ralph Eugene Meatyard 

I usually dont like to cut and paste but the description they give for his work is much better than anything I could write: Meatyard used  family and friends as models to generate enigmatic, hauntingly impenetrable dramas filled with surprise and fear. In his series of Surreal “Romances,” Meatyard had his models wear cheap Halloween masks as a symbolic device for diving below the surface of outer reality. Meatyard turned the regular confines of his square 2 1/4 inch camera format askew, portraying the precarious voyage of life. His often darkly printed and sometimes ghostly blurred images reinforced the idea of the world as frightening, unseeable, and unknowable. Like Clarence John Laughlin before him, Meatyard’s combination of real environments and phantasmal effects created ambiguous documents about identity, remembrance, and the continuance of time. 

It is so hard to choose my favorite Meatyard photo.

3 Aug 2014

nearlyvintage:

 

Tom Waits, David Bowie and Bette Midler


This may be my new favorite photo.

nearlyvintage:

 

Tom Waits, David Bowie and Bette Midler

This may be my new favorite photo.

(Source: awesomepeoplehangingouttogether)

3 Aug 2014

retrogasm:

Vive l’amour 

retrogasm:

Vive l’amour 

2 Aug 2014

retrogasm:

Mack Sennett high contrast girls…

retrogasm:

Mack Sennett high contrast girls…

1 Aug 2014

weirdvintage:

St. Mary’s College, 1959—Phone-booth stuffing began in Durban, South Africa in the 1950s, when 25 students packed themselves into a telephone booth.  It quickly swept college campuses the world over, and soon students were skipping classes to practice and perfect their methods to set a new record.  Some students went on diets, and some students at M.I.T. attempted to use geometry and calculus to figure out the best method to achieve the highest efficiency for stuffing.  There were different sets of “rules” cited, either of all limbs needing to be in, or that one person inside must place an actual phone call for it to be a valid “stuff”.  
The fad died out by 1959, but it was soon replaced by Volkswagen stuffing (via BadFads and Sports Illustrated)

Just in case you think it’s only the kids today who do weird shit. :]

weirdvintage:

St. Mary’s College, 1959—Phone-booth stuffing began in Durban, South Africa in the 1950s, when 25 students packed themselves into a telephone booth.  It quickly swept college campuses the world over, and soon students were skipping classes to practice and perfect their methods to set a new record.  Some students went on diets, and some students at M.I.T. attempted to use geometry and calculus to figure out the best method to achieve the highest efficiency for stuffing.  There were different sets of “rules” cited, either of all limbs needing to be in, or that one person inside must place an actual phone call for it to be a valid “stuff”.  

The fad died out by 1959, but it was soon replaced by Volkswagen stuffing (via BadFads and Sports Illustrated)

Just in case you think it’s only the kids today who do weird shit. :]

29 Jul 2014

(Source: metal-knife)

29 Jul 2014

bogarted:

Jean Harlow photographed by William Mortensen, 1927

bogarted:

Jean Harlow photographed by William Mortensen, 1927

26 Jul 2014

mortisia:

Let’s learn together about Edgar Allan Poe and his work. 33

The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven’s mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man’s slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word “Nevermore”. The poem makes use of a number of folk and classical references.

Edit by me | Please dont remove anything | For more here 

Poe claimed to have written the poem very logically and methodically, intending to create a poem that would appeal to both critical and popular tastes, as he explained in his 1846 follow-up essay “The Philosophy of Composition”. The poem was inspired in part by a talking raven in the novel Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of ‘Eighty by Charles Dickens. Poe borrows the complex rhythm and meter of Elizabeth Barrett’s poem “Lady Geraldine’s Courtship”, and makes use of internal rhyme as well as alliteration throughout. The Raven was first attributed to Poe in print in the New York Evening Mirror on January 29, 1845. Its publication made Poe widely popular in his lifetime, although it did not bring him much financial success. Soon reprinted, parodied, and illustrated, critical opinion is divided as to the poem’s status, but it nevertheless remains one of the most famous poems ever written.